Dominican Republic

This week we take you to a country not terribly far from our own, just a quick jaunt to the southeast from Florida we come to the Caribbean country of Dominican Republic. Other than being a hotbed of baseball activity, they have a fairly active tropical climate. Hurricanes are a constant threat during the summer and fall seasons, and often have diurnal convection pop off over the mountains that comprise the southwestern portion of the country. Temperatures vary little throughout the year as well, with the average temperature at the nation’s capital of Santo Domingo varying from 24 deg C in January to 27 deg C in July. While average rainfall over the northern half of the country is around 50″ or so, with some mountainous areas creeping towards 100″ in extreme cases, the southern side of the mountains are subject to the rain shadow effect, with some areas only getting 20-30″ of rain annually. Most of the country’s more populated areas are found along the coast in the southeast part of the island, taking advantage of the nearly constant beautiful weather that the D.R. gets to enjoy.
The Oficina Nacional de Meteorolog√≠a is the country’s governing body and has a fairly informed website. On the home page there are a few different satellite views of the Caribbean and most of the Tropical Atlantic, along with links to climatic data, the history of the National Meteorological Office, an extended outlook, among other things. Sadly, the links for the radar sites aren’t operational at this time, but otherwise, if you’ve brushed up on your Spanish recently, there’s a wealth of information to deduce.